Mayra Ruiz-McPherson | 3 tips to gradually transform the way you author your marketing content
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Just My Thoughts

3 TIPS TO GRADUALLY TRANSFORM THE WAY YOU AUTHOR YOUR MARKETING CONTENT

3 tips to gradually transform the way you author your marketing content

Is your marketing content intriguing?

When you write a sentence or a paragraph, be it for a blog post, an ebook, an email, an article, or whatever you’ve been tasked to compose … are you authoring copy that excites, informs, and entertains?

Or does it fall completely flat, despite your best efforts?

If you want to zest up your marketing content beyond the usual advice, then read on.

Many factors are involved in turning uninspired, flat content around.

And there are countless blog posts online offering helpful advice and guidance.

But in this post, I’ll address 3 specific tips to gradually transform the way you author your marketing content.

The goal is to offer you some practical guidance you can start TODAY to help refine and revive your brand content over time.

Let’s dive in.

  1. First, start listening to broadcast news. Seriously.
    Turn on any news broadcast on TV and LISTEN to an anchor’s or interviewer’s words. How does the anchor speak or present specific information? If you listen closely, you’ll start to hear eloquent word phrases, poignant language or explicit commentary that stands out from regular reporting. Obviously, whatever comes out of the mouths of the anchors will highly depend on what news show you are watching or what subject is being reported. Still, I always discover a new vocabulary word or two or a string of unexpected words paired together. I actually make it a point to listen to news shows with a notebook and jot down phrases or language that moves or intrigues me. I may never end up using those exact blurbs BUT I find this to be a helpful exercise that inspires my writing.
  2. Go headline crazy
    No matter WHAT you write, if the audience can’t get past the headline or subject line, it’s all a mute point in the end. So start studying headlines like nobody’s business. And I do mean STUDYING. Get granular. Study headline character counts and word limits (like those on the news website home pages, for example). Study “grammatical tempo” (how many adjectives, pronouns or nouns are used and in what order), which will highly vary depending on the online publication. Case in point, BuzzFeed headlines will differ from New York Times headlines and so on. Compare what you find or discover with headline templates for blog posts and the like. Keep your own running spreadsheet of headlines you really liked and use a second column to explain why. Identify any detail(s) that seduced your mouse click to learn or read more. Over time, you will inevitably start to see many different wording combinations or how the order of words and/or phrases inspire action or peak curiosity. The goal here is to leverage from the artistry of headline writing and find points of inspiration to fold into your own content development.
  3. Unleash yourself
    This one is a toughie, even for me, because marketing writing tends to be confined by brand standards, writing style guidelines, corporate frameworks, legal regulations, and other factors often imposed on brand journalism. No, I’m not saying you should divulge company secrets or drop F bombs every third word. I’m exaggerating, of course, but what I want you to do is to try to get beyond content restraints, industry lingo, and corporate-speak. Liberate your language. Give your words permission to inform AND entertain; to communicate AND to inspire. Write what you would write if you could speak freely, then tailor that content output to better align it to your brand’s content frameworks. The goal is to find the right balance of content standards and brand artistry so that the true potential of your content’s voice and marketing-inspired words can be realized.

The 3 tips I’ve shared above are mere starting points but should improve the quality of your brand’s content with practice.

And if you try any of these tips and have some success moving forward, please let me know!

Mayra Ruiz-McPherson

 

Photo credit: Mayra Ruiz-McPherson

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Mayra Ruiz-McPherson
mayra@ruizmcpherson.com